Developing a New Generation of Supercapacitors

SuperCapacitor Materials Ltd has developed new electrolytes providing capacitance values over 100 times those of conventional electrolytes.

Our electrolytes make possible supercapacitors with greatly increased energy storage capabilities that can surpass conventional batteries. SuperCapacitor Materials Ltd can now supply materials and assist potential commercial partners to develop a new generation of supercapacitors.

Our Technology

The energy density of a supercapacitor depends on the properties and effective surface area of the electrodes and the properties of the electrolyte.

  • Advantages

  • High charge and discharge rates
    Wide range of operating temperatures
    Long life cycles
  • Disadvantages

  • Low energy densities of approximately 3 – 7 WHr / Kg

SuperCapacitor Materials Ltd has researched and developed new, crosslinked gel electrolytes1 exhibiting measured capacitance values over 100 times those of conventional electrolytes2

These electrolytes are compatible with all normal production electrodes. They make possible supercapacitors with greatly enhanced specific energy storage capacities.We believe the combination of existing electrodes and our new electrolytes have the potential to create supercapacitors that have energy storage capacities which can approach or exceed existing battery systems.

 

  1. Patents filed and pending
  2. Electrochemical assessment of Augmented Optics Ltd Polymer Devices. Prof. D Fermin et al, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, October 2016.

About Us

SuperCapacitor Materials Ltd was established in 2016 to commercialise the development of crosslinked, gel-matrix polymers in supercapacitors from research carried out by Augmented Optics Ltd.

SuperCapacitor Materials Ltd is a wholly owned subsidiary of Augmented Optics Ltd, a company established to undertake the original Research Programme. The objective of the Research Programme was to develop new, electrically active materials for a number of electric and bio-electric applications. This work was undertaken at the University of Surrey, Guildford, with the assistance of the University of Bristol.

Key Executives

  • Jim Heathcote

  • CEO
  • Jim Heathcote was the CEO of ITM Power plc from 2003 to 2009. He took the company from start-up to an AIM-listed company in 4 years. He has worked with Dr. Highgate for 15 years.
  • Dr Donald Highgate

  • Director of Research
  • Dr. Highgate has worked with advanced polymers for over 40 years. He led the team that created materials used for extended wear contact lenses. He conceived and developed the materials used by ITM Power plc for use in fuel cells and electrolysers.
  • Nigel Spence, FCA

  • Finance Director
  • Nigel Spence was CFO of Wax Info Limited, a Cambridge University Healthcare spinout from 2000 to 2010, and has his own tax and accountancy practice. He studied chemistry with Jim Heathcote in the 1970s.

Latest News

Scientific breakthrough reveals unprecedented alternative to battery power storage – 6th December 2016

  • Major scientific breakthrough research has discovered new materials offering an alternative to battery power proven to be between 1,000-10,000 times more powerful than the existing battery alternative – a supercapacitor.
  • The new technology is believed to have the potential for electric cars to travel to similar distances as petrol cars without the need to stop for lengthy re-charging breaks of between 6-8 hours, and instead re-charge fully in the time it takes to fill a regular car with petrol.
  • The scientific findings made by Augmented Optics Ltd and its wholly owned subsidiary Supercapacitor Materials Ltd with the University of Surrey and University of Bristol have produced a safer, faster charging, more efficient and greener alternative to battery power and supercapacitor abilities as we currently know them.

Ground-breaking research from the University of Surrey and Augmented Optics Ltd., in collaboration with the University of Bristol, has developed potentially transformational technology which could revolutionise the capabilities of appliances that have previously relied on battery power to work.

This development by Augmented Optics Ltd., could translate into very high energy density super-capacitors making it possible to recharge your mobile phone, laptop or other mobile devices in just a few seconds.

The technology could have a seismic impact across a number of industries, including transport, aerospace, energy generation, and household applications such as mobile phones, flat screen electronic devices, and biosensors.  It could also revolutionise electric cars, allowing the possibility for them to recharge as quickly as it takes for a regular non-electric car to refuel with petrol – a process that currently takes approximately 6-8 hours to recharge.  Imagine, instead of an electric car being limited to a drive from London to Brighton, the new technology could allow the electric car to travel from London to Edinburgh without the need to recharge, but when it did recharge for this operation to take just a few minutes to perform.

Supercapacitor buses are already being used in China, but they have a very limited range whereas this technology could allow them to travel a lot further between recharges.  Instead of recharging every 2-3 stops this technology could mean they only need to recharge every 20-30 stops and that will only take a few seconds.

Elon Musk, of Tesla and SpaceX, has previously stated his belief that supercapacitors are likely to be the technology for future electric air transportation.  We believe that the present scientific advance could make that vision a reality.

The technology was adapted from the principles used to make soft contact lenses, which Dr Donald Highgate (of Augmented Optics, and an alumnus of the University of Surrey) developed following his postgraduate studies at Surrey 40 years ago.  Supercapacitors, an alternative power source to batteries, store energy using electrodes and electrolytes and both charge and deliver energy quickly, unlike conventional batteries which do so in a much slower, more sustained way. Supercapacitors have the ability to charge and discharge rapidly over very large numbers of cycles.  However, because of their poor energy density per kilogramme (approximately just one twentieth of existing battery technology), they have, until now, been unable to compete with conventional battery energy storage in many applications.

Dr Brendan Howlin of the University of Surrey, explained: “There is a global search for new energy storage technology and this new ultra capacity supercapacitor has the potential to open the door to unimaginably exciting developments.”

The ground-breaking research programme was conducted by researchers at the University of Surrey’s Department of Chemistry where the project was initiated by Dr Donald Highgate of Augmented Optics Ltd.  The research team was co-led by the Principal Investigators Dr Ian Hamerton and Dr Brendan Howlin.  Dr Hamerton continues to collaborate on the project in his new post at the University of Bristol, where the electrochemical testing to trial the research findings was carried out by fellow University of Bristol academic – David Fermin, Professor of Electrochemistry in the School of Chemistry.

Dr Ian Hamerton, Reader in Polymers and Composite Materials from the Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Bristol said:  “While this research has potentially opened the route to very high density supercapacitors, these *polymers have many other possible uses in which tough, flexible conducting materials are desirable, including bioelectronics, sensors, wearable electronics, and advanced optics.  We believe that this is an extremely exciting and potentially game changing development.”

*the materials are based on large organic molecules composed of many repeated sub-units and bonded together to form a 3-dimensional network.

Jim Heathcote, Chief Executive of both Augmented Optics Ltd and Supercapacitor Materials Ltd, said: “It is a privilege to work with the teams from the University of Surrey and the University of Bristol.  The test results from the new polymers suggest that extremely high energy density supercapacitors could be constructed in the very near future.  We are now actively seeking commercial partners in order to supply our polymers and offer assistance to build these ultra high energy density storage devices.”

NOTES FOR EDITOR:  For interview requests with the University of Surrey or Augmented Optics Ltd/Supercapacitor Materials Ltd please contact Ashley Lovell on 01483 686141 or email a.lovell@surrey.ac.uk

For interview requests with the University of Bristol please contact Joanne Fryer on 0117 331 7276, mobile 07747 768804 or email joanne.fryer@bristol.ac.uk

About Augmented Optics Ltd/Supercapacitor Materials Ltd

Augmented Optics Ltd was incorporated 3 years ago to research and develop new electronically conducting polymers. The Company has commissioned research at the University of Surrey and an evaluation programme at Bristol University that has generated important new materials with potentially valuable commercial properties. It was founded by Dr Donald Highgate, Jim Heathcote and Nigel Spence. Dr Highgate and Jim Heathcote have worked together on advanced polymers and energy technology for 15 years. The company has been funded by a number of investors expert in the support and exploitation of new technologies.

In light of the recent discovery of ‘high capacitance’ polymers that may be ready for immediate commercialisation a wholly owned subsidiary Supercapacitor Materials Ltd was registered and has the website www.Supercapacitormaterials.com.

About the University of Surrey

The University of Surrey is one of the UK’s top higher education institutions and was recognised as the University of the Year in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016. With 125 years of academic heritage since our founding in Battersea, and 50 years of world-class teaching and research in Guildford, the University of Surrey is the intellectual home for more than 15,200 students, 100,000 alumni and 2,800 staff.

Freedom of thought, pursuit of academic excellence, and the advancement and application of knowledge underpin the wonderful things happening here. Our mission is to transform lives and enrich society through outstanding teaching and learning, pioneering research and impactful innovation.

The University of Surrey has been recognised by three Queen’s Anniversary Prizes for Further and Higher Education and is a destination of choice for higher learning in subjects ranging from Engineering to the Arts. As a global university, we are proud of our strong partnerships with internationally leading institutions and businesses, while being firmly engaged with our local community in Guildford and Surrey. We are committed to educating the next generation of professionals and leaders, and to providing thought leadership and innovation to address global challenges and contribute to a better tomorrow for the world.

About the University of Bristol

The University of Bristol is one of the most popular and successful universities in the UK. It was ranked within the top 50 universities in the world in the QS World University Rankings 2016. The University of Bristol is ranked among the top five institutions in the UK for its research, according to new analysis of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, and is the 4th most targeted university by top UK employers

Bristol is a member of the Russell Group of UK research-intensive universities, and a member of the Worldwide Universities Network, a grouping of research-led institutions of international standing.

The University was founded in 1876 and was granted its Royal Charter in 1909.  It was the first university in England to admit women on the same basis as men.

The University is a major force in the economic, social and cultural life of Bristol and the region, but is also a significant player on the world stage. It has over 16,000 undergraduates and nearly 6,000 postgraduate students from more than 100 countries, and its research links span the globe.

Thirteen Bristol graduates and members of staff have been awarded Nobel Prizes, including Sir Winston Churchill who was Chancellor of the University of Bristol from 1929 until 1965.

Contact Us

  • Telephone

  • 01223 581210